Category Archives: art movement

Are going to the party?

Whenever i choose to go out in public with friends (mostly just to keep myself from becoming a goblin) i always end up having a great time because of them. However, the whole process of meeting people that will probably never share anything besides a few blurred sentences; dressing a certain way to complement the caged arena; head-bobbing/bouncing to a song that loops the off-key voice of a lady that may/may not be under the spell of an auto-tune; all the while im trying to consume as much alcohol as possible to ease awkward eye-contact sequences with my bartender…yeaa, that process just doesn’t appeal to me.
Lindsay Scoggins has actually simplified this whole process through a range of edited/juxtaposed mammals in her video “party animals”; which serves as the promo for the contemporary art show curated by her as well. This girl is a pro at beat-editing, and quite the master of contemporary satirical content. Check out her YouTube channel if you haven’t done so already.

***Also, many thanxs to Jay for introducing me to the term “goblin”; which i will shamelessly abuse in future posts***

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delicate intensities


There is no way colors can communicate like the rise/fall of a line. The intuitive placement of a single line (this can be applied to handwriting as well) can open up a pandoras box of expression. Unlike color, which one can manipulate in shades/tint if mixed properly, lines have a very ‘unforgiven’ way of stating truth and purpose. For instance, they have a way of expressing movement that a detailed photograph bathed in strong contrasts wouldn’t be able to achieve. Lines evoke change and strength, yet have the delicacy to remain unobtrusive.

Lines are life in movement, and often the founding structure of color. At times, some of us tend to believe in color and completely dismiss lines when interpreting intentions. Simply because our eyes can discern and associate certain moods and feelings with a generic/basic knowledge of color theory. If we tried to explain or even rely on the intensity of lines to evoke/communicate a purpose, we’d have to take the time to study its roots; the guts and the worlds within us; everything that we cannot see that marks the intensity and shapes the course of a line.

I stumbled upon Ror-shak a couple of years ago when myspace wasn’t yet a hooker site. Immediately, i fell in love with the visual sounds and structured story lines in their music, so i bought the CD through their paypal store at the time. It is one of the few CD’s i keep in its original case, simply because the case itself is a linear relic. Im not particularly into bold symbolic gestures like skulls and graphic design, but i think the lines in the cover of that CD suits perfectly. I also think if they read this post, they’d probably agree with my linear nonsense.

Unpretended


“There are two things that don’t have to mean anything, one is music, and the other is laughter”

Last time i visited NYC, i startled up a conversation with a friend who’s a musician about creating a visual project based on the layered sounds of the city. We stayed still for about five minutes, and just tuned in to the sounds of NY. Not conversations, like the typical nosy New Yorker, but the actual sounds of the city; the background noise of real life, melting/welding together into what we call “the familiar”

This is not a new concept, although it might be if you’ve never heard of John Cage’s 4:33. I find myself quoting, and often using John Cage as a theme of conversation, simply because he breaks down complex ideas in realistic/modern terms. Music and visuals for example, don’t have to be decipherable to human senses, or even appealing to be interesting and meaningful. In fact, iconic art filled with clear statements and loud/bright colors can often dull down a piece to a level which can no longer be considered genuine. This concept can be connected to anything, not just limited to music and visuals; human relationships also apply, by using fewer words and more gestures to perfect the art of communication.

Lost Things

One of the main reasons i praise stop-motion animation is because of it’s endless possibilities. Stop-motion has a way of getting away with fluid movement and minimal cuts/frames that never ceases to impress me. In the old days, animation studios like soyszmultfilm would accomplish stop motion by putting together a model, taking a shot with a film camera, moving it a bit, taking another shot, and another shot and so on. When i look at how stop-motion has changed, i realize that the procedure still remains intact, but it has advanced incredibly in terms of storyline and the tools used to execute it.

Similar to Oren Lavies “Morning Elegance”, Alison Sudol wrote the piece of music specifically for this short film written and directed by Angela Kohler.

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Thoughts on Gestures

When i began my college years as a fine arts/painting student, i had a drawing/figure anatomy professor who would constantly stress the importance of gestural drawings in order to embody anatomical proportions. Being the hard-headed donkey i am, i refused to let my subconscious take over the technical skills i held so dearly throughout the first semester with that professor. I would pride myself in dotting every line where it was supposed to, and reading books that explained how angles played alongside shadows to give the illusion of mass/weight upon a person/object.
It wasn’t until a project was assigned in which we were instructed to let go of every technical procedure, and draw to the rhythm of songs, that i understood why gestural drawings were so important to this peculiar professor. In order to carve out images from a blank canvas, i had to let go of all my beliefs, and open myself up to being wrong about everything i was taught in books. Kind of like falling in love, a procedure that requires no technical skills or even right/wrong approaches, i had to let down every technical/egotistical wall around my confidence and skills in order to understand and convey through a drawing.

“Thought of You” is the kind of film that can impact you with a wide range of emotions through simple gestures. Animator Ryan Woodward combines visual Fx, 2D-animation and choreography with his sense of visual poetry and love. An artist bold enough to convey emotions through gestures is something we seldom have the chance to experience in the art world. Below i posted the making of if you’re interested in learning a bit more about the artist and these kind of gestural projects.

almost effortlessly..


“It has to do with the surface of both, which at the end becomes erased, or more erased. Before that, they were richer, full of things. Uglier, but more precise maybe”
-Gerhard Richter

When I think of really intense sensations, like experiencing a moment of pure bliss, or feeling deeply connected to someone else’s understanding of these emotions; I find my head lurking visually for a spot filled with tranquility. Not charged with busy backgrounds, or strong statements, but instead a spot within monotoned and saturated images that contains very little color. Probably one of the reasons to detest most pop art and modern photography is the abusive use of color to convey emotion. I find this so incredibly forced, when it should look almost effortlessly. I caught myself completely falling for this track visually, like the first time I experienced a Gerhard Richter painting up close. Richter’s technique can be found remarkably perfected in Blakes video. Blurred, erased, focused in some areas, but overall revealing a main purpose/intent. I get completely lost in these images, almost effortlessly.


A wilhelm scream is a stock sound effect used in hollywood movies (for ex: a coyote howl, hooting owl, lightning and thunder)

WE OWN THE SKY

This year has been an incredible source of inspiration for myself, and i believe also my surroundings. Living life in the present moment, not worrying about things that can be solved through intangible purchases or monetary exchange. The personal bonds we’ve built along the lines of this fickle life will be what is carried on to the next. In 2011, i plan on making these already built foundations into the tall and solid skyscrapers they are. I will remember this year as the wind that changed my path; a path that has proven to be/will be, nothing short of incredible. With that conclusion, I leave you all with my warmest regards and wishes for paving/changing your very own path in 2011, make it a memorable one.

“We Own The Sky” By M83. Directed by Alex Takacs and Joe Nankin of Young Replicant. D.Photog. Adam Kauper. A perfect blend of imaginative cinematography and special effects portraying life as we know it; full of emotions, ups and downs, climaxes and tribulations.