Kari Altmann

Kari Altmann is a Baltimore-based artist whose works propose questions of technological interaction, and its relationship to the modern cultures use of such as a mode of communication. I stumbled across her work while listening to the song below. Immediately, i fell for the minimalistic and ridiculous effects that play along so well with 10mi stereo lyrics. It reminded me of a cheap iChat effect, and this is probably the initial reaction of plenty when they compare it to the iChat interface. As you start to look around, little 3D trinkets and symbols begin to appear alongside the human figures. She uses various forms of editing and 3D softwares, and technically, It’s pretty interesting to try and decipher everything that goes on in her work.

I found this while scavenging the artists shows and influences:

“I can only speak for myself, and I identify more with the ideas of post-network art or internet-aware art. As we’ve expanded our view of the relationships and voids between everything from databases or networks to dataclouds and holograms, we’ve arrived at a better realization of the virtual and physical properties inherent in everything. Everything becomes matter, energy, and representation, and is connected to everything else. This idea isn’t new, but I’m sure that the experience of growing up with the internet has affected the way that many artists my age approach it. We’ve had an unprecedented accessibility to a more “zoomed-out” and multidimensional understanding of our environments.

If you have an understanding of this infinite matter you can also learn from it and interact with it in infinite ways. The material we deal with everyday moves back and forth between virtual and physical form so fluidly. Each seems both tangible and imaginary. You are always interacting with matter “through” other matter. This is where processes like hacking, aggregation, modulation, disembodying and many more come into play, through surfaces and intermediaries. We are simultaneously sourcing from this ecosystem, interacting with it, and creating it.”

Also, if you’re interested in reading more about her work, here’s a pretty extensive INTERVIEW on her digitalisms

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